Nissan LEAF 0-60 times

Autotk.com offers accurate information on Nissan LEAF 0-60 times and quarter mile from trusted sources. You may also keep track of how 0-60 times of Nissan LEAF changed across years and check out the model’s competitors with the same acceleration performance.

Our mission is to present an easy-to-read and comprehensive information on Nissan LEAF 0-60 mph and quarter mile for the devoted geeks, as it is an essential indicator of the vehicle power.

2018 Nissan LEAF 0-60 times, all trims

Trim, HP, Engine, Transmission0-60 times1/4 mile times
SV 4dr Hatchback,147 hp

9.7 sec

17.3 @ 79 mph
S 4dr Hatchback,147 hp

9.7 sec

17.3 @ 79 mph

2017 Nissan LEAF 0-60 times, all trims

Trim, HP, Engine, Transmission0-60 times1/4 mile times
SL 4dr Hatchback,107 hp

9.7 sec

17.3 @ 79 mph
SV 4dr Hatchback,107 hp

9.7 sec

17.3 @ 79 mph
S 4dr Hatchback,107 hp

9.7 sec

17.3 @ 79 mph

2016 Nissan LEAF 0-60 times, all trims

Trim, HP, Engine, Transmission0-60 times1/4 mile times
SV 4dr Hatchback,107 hp

9.7 sec

17.3 @ 79 mph
S 4dr Hatchback,107 hp

9.7 sec

17.3 @ 79 mph

Nissan LEAF 0-60 mph acceleration across years

Year of a Model0-60 times1/4 mile times
2018

9.7 sec

17.3 @ 79 mph
2017

9.7 sec

17.3 @ 79 mph
2016

9.7 sec

17.3 @ 79 mph
2015

9.7 - 10.2 sec

17.3 @ 79 - 17.5 @ 78 mph
2014

6.9 - 7.9 sec

15.1 @ 0 - 16.4 @ 0 mph
2013

7.9 - 10 sec

16.4 @ 78 - 17.3 @ 78 mph
2012

6.9 - 10 sec

15.4 @ 78 - 17.3 @ 78 mph
2011

6.9 - 7.9 sec

15.4 @ 78 - 16.4 @ 78 mph

Nissan LEAF competitors' 0-60 mph acceleration

Cars with the same 0-60 time

2018 Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid

0-60 times 9.7 sec

1/4 mile 17.3 sec @ 79
2018 Kia Soul EV

0-60 times 9.7 sec

1/4 mile 17.4 sec @ 79
2018 Nissan Rogue

0-60 times 9.7 sec

1/4 mile 17.6 sec @ 78

Introduction

Electric cars are all the rage these days, and most car manufacturers are working hard to release working models of these vehicles. This, however, is not the case for Nissan that has gone on to release the second generation of the Nissan Leaf. The leaf was selling more than any other electric vehicle sales in Britain, and this begun even before the manufacturer had completed production.

The first generation Nissan leaf was simple, practical, had low running costs and could be charged from home. When you also consider the fact that it was affordable and could comfortably sit five people, it is easy to understand why it has such a loyal fan base. Not forgetting that most individuals, who start to use electric cars, rarely go back to combustible engines.
However, even with its amazing features, it had some shortcoming, which put the leaf at a disadvantage when compared to Teslas. The car was a bit slow, did not have an attractive body, and also lacked range, although this becomes less of an issue with the 30kWh battery upgrade. To stay afloat and get ahead in the market the manufacturer desperately needs to make a couple of changes.
The new model leaf comes with upgrades that promise more assistance, a faster car with more time in between charges and also lower prices. Here are the specs;

 

Engine Specs and 0-60

One thing that leaf enthusiasts love about the car is that the engine is smooth and silent. The car is not made for racing, but can still hold its own at 50mph. What you need to remember is that you cannot drive the leaf as you would a GTI, otherwise the car will resist and push back. When driving the Nissan Leaf, you will sometimes feel like it has a mind of its own. However, although its acceleration is smooth do not step down too hard while on the motorway, or you will find yourself in trouble.

The motor in the newer model has not been changed but Nissan but installed a more powerful inverter. If you are feeling a bit lost, the inverter is the device that controls and supplies the electricity in the car. The upgrade means that the motor in the car can now generate more power, up to about 156hp. The car can go from 0-60mph in 7.9 sec.
During test runs, our team drove the leaf up a 2,400m mountainside. On the way up the car struggled a bit and the battery charge dropped alarmingly fast. Coming back down, we were able to get back 11 per cent of the charge using regeneration. The car is not made for rugged mountainous terrain, and therefore in flat terrain, you will not need to worry about this.

The ‘e pedal’ which is a unique feature that comes with the car is another thing to get excited about. This feature allows you to have a blend of friction and regenerative braking the moment you start to ease off the accelerator. It means that as you drive you do not need to keep using the brake pedal. Once you get used to it, you may even start to like and anticipate how the car will behave.

The design of the e pedal will tell the car when friction braking is needed, and also when to turn on the brake lights. Additionally, unless the battery is full, the vehicle tends to use electric retardation instead of engaging the brakes unless you are driving very slowly. Typically, you will only need to step on the brake pedal when going over 0.2 g.
The centre of gravity in this car is pretty low, and this makes it stable and entirely predictable to drive. This feature makes the car a joy to drive especially when rounding corners. Not to mention how well the steering responds. The tires fitted are low resistance, and this affects the grip of the car, which might put a damper on how the steering responds to your turns.
Nissan managed put install radar cruise control in this hatchback. While this features is not new in cars, it was mainly found in larger vehicles. The feature is called ProPilot, and in the higher up Tekna models, this feature includes lane following and a traffic jam assist option. The problem with these systems is that the steering assist is affected and a bit confused by glare and things like repair lines. All the models, apart from the base trim get the radar cruise feature, but it comes without steering function. Additionally, they have radar sensors, which are ideal for offering cross traffic assistance and warning about blind spots.

 

Exterior and Interior

Some of the features of the leaf would feel strange initially. For example, the steering column does not telescope. Meaning that if you find it too close or too far, adjusting it is not an option. The only option you have is adjusting the seat.
The inside of this car is quite spacious with spongy seats. The people sitting in the back would be pretty comfortable, except that there is very little leg room under the front seats. The trunk space is similar to that of other medium-sized hatchbacks, but the car does not come with a spare wheel.

The cabins space has been done using a mix of high and not so good quality materials. The doors and the dashboard area are done with the relatively high-quality attractive material. The cup holders, however, are made of hard plastic and only come in one size which is inconvenient. All in all, the cabin is practical but has nothing to fawn over as with the Golf.
Nissan has also tried to normalise the interior of the cabin. The interior systems like the Bose stereo and screens have subdued graphics and offer a wealth of information when it comes to entertainment, energy consumption, journey and general assistance. In all the other models apart from the base model, you can get build in apps in addition to Android Auto and Apple Carplay.

 

Verdict

The Nissan Leaf has been evolving consistently. It can be said without a doubt that with the 2018 model the manufacturer has taken many steps in the right direction. Its body is entirely different and more pleasant. Although it’s inner workings, have not changed much the larger battery capacity and additional power are a welcome change.

 


See More: Nissan LEAF Weight, MPG


Nissan LEAF specs

LEAF 0-60 times
LEAF horsepower
LEAF dimensions
LEAF wheels
LEAF tire size
Custom LEAF